Reducing the Impact of Disasters Through Education
State Information

Situation

 

EDEN is responding to the massive flooding in South Carolina. Monitor this activity in the EDEN Helps Now section, below.

Check the Requests page to see what types of assistance South Carolina has requested and how that request is being handled.

Extension educators and agents: If you were in the path of a flood, let us know how you are. If you are engaged in flood preparedness, flood damage reduction and/or flood recovery efforts,
please SEND US A NOTE either by email or using our online form. 

Click here for EDEN member institution cataloged resources tagged as Hazard=flood
Filters will be on the left nav bar
Use "Flooding 2015" as the event name when submitting a Response Note for this event.



Gauges, Forecasting and Outlooks 

River Forecast Center map and hyperlink

NOTE: The Carolina flooding is covered by the Southeast River Forecast Center, directly addressed at http://www.srh.noaa.gov/serfc/.

NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) operates 13 River Forecast Centers across the United States. River Forecast Centers collect, process, and provide forecasts and information about water resources for major river basins across the country. This network is supported by the extensive gauge system of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and gauges operated by the Corps of Engineers and others. Current stages, river forecasts and precipitation can be accessed directly at http://water.weather.gov/ahps


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Field report from Sea Grant 

The following situation was distributed by Rick Devoe in an email to Sea Grant Director colleagues. It made its way out as the recipients extended the call for assistance to others and is printed here with the author's permission.

Please read https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/10/05/the-meteorology-behind-south-carolinas-catastrophic-1000-year-rainfall-event/  if you are interested in the nature of the flooding event we in the state of South Carolina just experienced. 
 
In the Charleston area, we had anywhere from 15-25 inches of rain over three days. But I think we fared better than our inland brethren, because they do not have low tides, but do have hills and valleys and extensive river floodplains, and earthen dams, etc. that made them more susceptible to flooding events. The University of South Carolina’s main campus in Columbia, SC is closed for the week because there is no potable water available.  The salinity in our coastal rivers has reached zero in some places.  And the USGS folks are telling us we may have WQ issues in our rivers for the next one-to-two months as the uplands “drain themselves.”  Unbelievable.  But most folks in this neck of the woods are survivors, and are very good neighbors.  And really, the folks in South Carolina are hanging in there, and the state will recover stronger than ever (and maybe a little bit wiser as well).  But they need information.
 
So I am writing to you folks to seek your assistance.  We established a coastal information network (SC-CIN; the “CIN” network; see the www.sccoastalinfo.org portal) some years ago which we use to coordinate and partner up  outreach/extension/education efforts and resources of a host of coastal outreach partners in South Carolina (e.g., CTPs, coop extension, NOAA agencies, CZM, SCDNR-marine resources, COGs, etc.) so that constituencies (e.g., local governments) have a “one-stop” shop for their coastal information needs.
 
We are setting up a “SC Flood” section on the SC-CIN portal where we are placing links to available information tools, resources, manuals, how-to and how-not-to booklets, etc. for these communities and others to access. Since most if not all of you have had experiences with water and flooding, I would greatly appreciate if your program would send me links to those information resources (PDF copies are also welcome) which might be useful to our communities, businesses, and homeowners as they work to recover and restore their buildings, structures, and homes. And if you know of portals that already exist for such information, please share those as well.

- Rick Devoe, Executive Director, S.C. Sea Grant Consortium


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EDEN Helps Now! 

EDEN has reached out to the EDEN delegates and Sea Grant extension in South Carolina, through the flood NEIL and Sea Grant member liaison, offering assistance.

When "noting" your response or assistance, select "Flooding 2015" as the Event Name in EDEN Response Notes. Please submit notes when your Extension system offers assistance to Extension in the impacted areas. EDEN and eXtension will be submitting notes to document our efforts.


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Last Updated:10/10/2015 12:31 PM
 

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