Reducing the Impact of Disasters Through Education
State Information

Tennessee Experience

 



Requests for Assistance 

Tennessee has made no requests for assistance from the network or our USDA partner for this disaster.

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Response Notes Digest 

 

SituationAwareness:

Entered June 3 from a Response Note received May 16.

The Mississippi River reached record or near-record crests in West Tennessee during the week of May 9, and is expected to remain above flood stage possibly until late May or early June.  These crests approached or exceeded the historic 1937 flood levels and threatened to overtop or damage mainline levees along the Mississippi River and tributaries.  As the floods approached the levee levels, thousands of residents were advised to evacuate.  River traffic was halted for brief period due to the wakes of barges splashing over the levees.  Emergency actions were underway to fortify and raise the levees in Lake County until there was reason to believe catastrophic flooding was averted by the Corps of Engineers intentionally breaching a levee upstream of Tennessee that lowered the river crest a small amount.  Had the levees along Madrid Bend failed, virtually all of Lake County would have been inundated.  Other towns further down the Mississippi River experienced flooding due to tributaries being backed up by the rising Mississippi River and locally more than 8 inches of rainfall.  Many major  roads, including Interstate 40 west of Memphis, and rail lines were closed, disrupting travel and commerce.
Agricultural impacts will be significant in flooded areas.  Wheat and other grain crops will not be harvested.  Corn that was already planted is lost, and fertilizers and other inputs will also be lost.  Other crops will not be planted on time due to submerged fields and deposits of mud and debris.

ImpactUni:

No reported flood damage to Extension offices; however Lake County Extension was closed during the evacuation orders. 

UniResponseEfforts:

The UT Extension Flood Recovery website is still active from the May 2010 floods. This website draws heavily on materials from other EDEN institutions, and LSU AgCenter in particular. 

UseofEDENResourcs:

The UT Extension Flood Recovery website is still active from the May 2010 floods. This website draws heavily on materials from other EDEN institutions, and LSU AgCenter in particular. 

DisasterInstitution:

University of Tennessee   [Tim Prather]


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Last Updated:6/3/2011 4:11 PM
 

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